Download A shorter course in English grammar and composition (1880).pdf PDF

TitleA shorter course in English grammar and composition (1880).pdf
TagsEnglish Grammar English Language Adverb Adjective Part Of Speech
File Size16.4 MB
Total Pages200
Document Text Contents
Page 1

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Page 2

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.

Shelf., \A/SS

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

Page 100

96 ETYMOLOGY.

THE INTERJECTION.
[See Preparatory Lessons, § 18.]

114. An interjection* is an exclamatory word that is
used to express some strong or sudden emotion of the
mind :

Ah! alas! O! oh! ho! ha! indeed! pshaw! welcome! hurrah!

The interjection O should be a capital.
Other parts of speech are frequently used to perform the office

of interjections:

Hark! surprising! mercy!

EXERCISE ON PREPOSITIONS, CONJUNCTIONS, AND
INTERJECTIONS.

1. " The winds which blow across the land are dry and arid,
but those which cross the water are moist and full of vapor."

2. " Do you hope to win respect when you flatter me?"
3. " Camels walk through the heavy sands in the desert of

Arabia."
4. " In the delineation of character, Tacitus is unrivaled

among historians, and has very few superiors among dramatists
and novelists."



Macaidaij.

5. "0 Cuckoo! shall I 'call thee Bird,
Or but a wandering voice?

1
'



Wordsworth.
6. " Ah, how unjust to Nature and himself

Is thoughtless, thankless, inconsistent man!"



Young.
7. "Catch, then, catch the transient hour;

Improve each shining moment as it flies."



Johnson.

Point out the prepositions in the foregoing sentences, and the relations
which they express.

Point out the conjunctions, and the words or sentences connected by
the?n. Which of them are coordinate conjunctions and which subor-
dinate ?

Point out the interjections.

The word interjection is derived from the Latin word interjectus, which
signifies thrown bekveen.

Page 101

EXERCISE—COMPOSITION. 97
Open your readers and point out prepositions, telling the relations

which they express.

Point out conjunctions and tell what words or sentences are connected

by them.

Point out coordinate conjunctions; —subordinate conjunctions. Point
out interjections.

Write sentences containing prepositions

;

—coordinate conjunctions

;


subordinate conjunctions

;

—interjections.

COMPOSITION EXERCISE XV.
BELLS.

Write twelve or more lines on Bells.

Point out the prepositions , conjunctions, and interjections in your com-
position.

REVIEW.
Define a Preposition. Examples. Illustrate the office of preposi-

tions. Name ten or more prepositions. Define a Conjunction. Into
what classes are conjunctions divided? What is a coordinate con-
junction? Examples. A subordinate conjunction ? Examples. Define
an Interjection. Examples. How should the interjection be written ?

COMPOSITION EXERCISE XVI.
CONVERSATION.

Let an interesting portion of history or a prominent historical char-
acter furnish the subject for a conversation; as, The Discovery of Amer-
ica; First Settlement of the Country ; Early Struggles icith the Indians;
Alfred the Great; Benjamin Franklin; Captain John Smith, etc.

Criticisms and suggestions.

Capital Letters.

115. The following classes of words should commence
with capitals.

Page 200

LIBRARY OFCONGRESS

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