Download Childhood injury prevention PDF

TitleChildhood injury prevention
File Size1.8 MB
Total Pages155
Table of Contents
                            List of figures
List of tables
List of appendices
List of abbreviations / acronyms
Executive summary
1 Introduction
	1.1 Background
	1.2 Scale and impact of childhood injury
	1.3 Project scope
	1.4 Report structure
2 Methods
3 Key components of a coordinated approach to childhood injury prevention
	3.1 Policy leadership
		3.1.1 Stakeholder views
		3.1.2 Barriers
			3.1.2.1 Complexity of injury
			3.1.2.2 Lack of leadership and government related challenges
		3.1.3 Implications for NSW
	3.2 Data and information systems
		3.2.1 Stakeholder views
		3.2.2 Barriers
		3.2.3 Implications for NSW
	3.3 Research and knowledge translation networks
		3.3.1 Stakeholder views
		3.3.2 Barriers
		3.3.3 Implications for NSW
	3.4 Coalitions, collaborations and partnerships
		3.4.1 Stakeholder views
		3.4.2 Barriers
		3.4.3 Implications for NSW
	3.5 Role of the Child Death Review Team in childhood injury prevention
		3.5.1 International experience
		3.5.2 Australian context
		3.5.3 Stakeholder views
			3.5.3.1 Potential leadership role of CDRT
			3.5.3.2 Context
			3.5.3.3 Stakeholder knowledge of the CDRT
			3.5.3.4 From reviewing deaths to serious injury
			3.5.3.5 Implications of expanding role to include serious injury
		3.5.4 Implications for NSW
	3.6 Conclusion
		Policy leadership
		Data and information systems
		Research and knowledge translation networks
		Coalitions, collaborations and partnerships
		Strategic observations and recommendation
Example of effective policy leadership – Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (United States)
Example of effective policy leadership –Parachute (Canada)
Example of coordination of data and information systems – Swedish Initiative for Research on Microdata in the Social and Medical Sciences (SIMSAM)
Example of coordination of data and information systems – Secure Anonymised Information Linkage (SAIL) Databank – Wales
Example of coordination of research and knowledge translation networks – Center for Child Injury Prevention Studies, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Research Institute
Example of coordination of research and knowledge translation networks – Monash University Accident Research Centre
Example of effective collaboration – European Child Safety Alliance
Example of effective collaboration – Department of Health Western Australia & Injury Control Council of Western Australia
4 References
                        

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