Download EgyptHistory-Garstang PDF

TitleEgyptHistory-Garstang
TagsDesert River Nile Egypt
File Size6.0 MB
Total Pages131
Document Text Contents
Page 2

CORNELL
UNIVERSITY

LIBRARY

BOUGHTWITH THE INCOME
OF THE SAGE ENDO\VMENT
FUND GIVEN IN 189I BY
HENRY WILLIAMS SAGE

Page 65

so The Feudal Period.

MapJU.

MEDITZRRANLZAN

It C or6r««n»«li )|

O^'tn'.h.re i SLOiifhni.t* 0>tbrd

EGYPT UNDERTHE FEUDAL PERIOD.

Page 66

The Feudal Period. 5

1

In the lord's house there was an equivalent retinue and
service. A Steward of the domains was the first official,
under whom were Superintendents of the lands, the tomb
lands, the weaving, and the warehouse. There was also

a doctor with his scribes, and attached to all, numerous

servants and attendants. A special herdsman and a fowler
supplied the kitchen, while in the household itself were

the food providers, the washermen, housemaids, and other

servants. The taxation, being in kind, was arranged by
a system of large courtyards and storehouses, specially
marked as belonging to the treasury. As the tendency
with this gathering power on the part of the lords was to

eliminate the presence of the sovereign from before the

people, all these relations between province and state came
to pass directly through the hands of the lord and his

officials. Under these circumstances the king found his
powers gradually slipping away. The requests of the lords,
however placed before him, were difficult to refuse, and
presently came to carry the weight of demands. Every
resource was tried to pacify these ambitious vassals. Their

sons were educated at the royal nursery and received royal

brides, while their daughters were honoured by invitation to

the royal harlm. But such devices could only ward off the

imminent crisis. Disaffection, imperceptible at first, then

manifesting itself, was sternly repressed by neighbouring

provinces. Many of the powerful lords doubtless coveted
the throne, regarding jealously one another and their

belittled sovereign, eager to fight for themselves, but not

to combine. The hot breath of discontent fanned their
ambitions, until the strain on all sides became too severe

for the crumbled fabric of the constitution to withstand it,

and the flame of civil and internecine war, once kindled,

could not be stamped out before its devastation was

£ 2

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