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TitleMastering Academic Writing in the Sciences : A Step-by-Step Guide
File Size2.2 MB
Total Pages201
Table of Contents
                            Cover
Half title
Title
Copyrights
Dedication
Contents
List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Introduction
Section I Foundations
Chapter 1  Before You Begin
	1.1 WHAT IS ACADEMIC WRITING?
	1.2 WRITING AS A CRAFT
	1.3 GETTING STARTED
	1.4 THE WRITER’S MINDSET
	1.5 STRATEGIES TO AVOID PROCRASTINATION
		1.5.1 Managing time
		1.5.2 Managing distractions
		1.5.3 Staying on track: Weekly check-ups
	1.6 YOUR WRITING SKILLS: SELF­ASSESSMENT CHECKLIST
Section II The Writing Process
Chapter 2  Pre­Writing Step
	2.1 GATHERING AND ORGANISING INFORMATION
	2.2 THE THREE OBJECTIVES OF READING
		2.2.1 Capturing content: Taking notes while reading
			2.2.1.1 The paper annotation tool
		2.2.2 Capturing structure: Developing a template
		2.2.3 Capturing style: Learning from the masters
	2.3 THE LITERATURE REVIEW
		2.3.1 What it is and why it matters
		2.3.2 The literature review as a process
		2.3.3 Critical voice
		2.3.4 The literature review as a product
		2.3.5 How to write a literature review
		2.3.6 Literature review matrix
Chapter 3  The Drafting Step
	3.1 WHO IS YOUR AUDIENCE?
	3.2 TALKING ABOUT YOUR RESEARCH
	3.3 GETTING THE STRUCTURE RIGHT
	3.4 MIND MAPS
	3.5 CORE DUMP
Chapter 4  The Revising Step
	4.1 THE TRIAGE APPROACH
	4.2 COMMON PROBLEMS
		4.2.1 Faulty organisation
		4.2.2 Lack of clarity
		4.2.3 Inappropriate usage of language
		4.2.4 Poor grammar
	4.3 TIPS FOR A BETTER STRUCTURE
	4.4 PARAGRAPHS AS BUILDING BLOCKS
	4.5 REVERSE OUTLINING
	4.6 LINKING PARAGRAPHS TOGETHER
	4.7 PARALLEL STRUCTURE
	4.8 FEEDBACK: WHEN, WHAT, AND WHOM TO ASK
Chapter 5  The Editing Step
	5.1 HOW GOOD IS YOUR WRITING?
	5.2 SCIENTIFIC STYLE IN ACADEMIC WRITING
	5.3 PEARLS OF WISDOM: ADVICE FOR A BETTER STYLE
		5.3.1 Verbs in action
		5.3.2 Verbs in disguise
		5.3.3 Active or passive?
		5.3.4 I or we? Personal pronouns in scientic writing
	5.4 DE­CLUTTER YOUR TEXT
		5.4.1 Awkward phrases and waste words
		5.4.2 Transition words
		5.4.3 Redundant information
		5.4.4 Negative statements
Chapter 6  The Proofreading Step
	6.1 WHEN DETAILS MATTER
	6.2 COMMON GRAMMAR MISTAKES
		6.2.1 Homophones
		6.2.2 Subject-verb concordance
		6.2.3 Singular or plural?
		6.2.4 Dangling participle
		6.2.5 Ambiguous referencing
	6.3 PUNCTUATION MARKS OFTEN MISUSED
		6.3.1 Comma
		6.3.2 Semi-colon
		6.3.3 Colon
		6.3.4 Hyphen
		6.3.5 Apostrophe
	6.4 SPELLING CHECKS
	6.5 CITATIONS AND BIBLIOGRAPHIES
		6.5.1 What to cite, where, and how
		6.5.2 Reference formats
	6.6 PROOFREADING CHECKLIST
Chapter 7  The Technical Stuff
	7.1 TITLES
	7.2 TABLE OF CONTENTS
	7.3 FIGURES AND TABLES
		7.3.1 What goes in a gure
		7.3.2 Figure captions
		7.3.3 Examples of poorly prepared gures
		7.3.4 What goes in a table
		7.3.5 Table titles
	7.4 EQUATIONS AND SYMBOLS
	7.5 REPORTING EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS
	7.6 APPENDICES
	7.7 GLOSSARY AND LISTS OF ACRONYMS
	7.8 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
Chapter 8  Worked­out Examples
	8.1 ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN DATA CENTERS
	8.2 COLORECTAL CANCER
	8.3 BLAINVILLE’S BEAKED WHALES
Section III Supporting Material
Chapter 9  Section Templates
	9.1 INTRODUCTION
		9.1.1 The purpose
		9.1.2 Building a template: A worked-out example
		9.1.3 Introduction: A template
	9.2 METHODS
		9.2.1 The purpose
		9.2.2 Methods: A template
	9.3 DATA ANALYSIS AND RESULTS
		9.3.1 The purpose
		9.3.2 Data analysis and results: A template
	9.4 DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS
		9.4.1 The purpose
		9.4.2 Discussion and conclusions: A template
	9.5 ABSTRACT
		9.5.1 The purpose
		9.5.2 Abstract: A template
Chapter 10  Elements of English Grammar
	10.1 BASIC TERMS AND DEFINITIONS
		10.1.1 Clauses and sentences
		10.1.2 Subject
		10.1.3 Object
		10.1.4 Nouns
		10.1.5 Pronouns
		10.1.6 Adjectives and adverbs
		10.1.7 Prepositions and conjunctions
		10.1.8 Verbs
		10.1.9 Phrasal verbs
		10.1.10 Verb tenses
		10.1.11 Innitives, participles, and gerunds
		10.1.12 Auxiliary and modal verbs
	10.2 SIMILAR MEANING, DIFFERENT SPELLING
		10.2.1 Due to or owing to?
		10.2.2 That or which?
		10.2.3 Fewer or less?
		10.2.4 Who or whom? and other personal pronouns
	10.3 SIMILAR SPELLING, DIFFERENT MEANING
References
Index
                        

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