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TitleThe Atharvaveda and the Paippalada-sakha
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Contents

Arlo Griffiths
Prefatory Remarks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . III

Philipp Kubisch
The Metrical and Prosodical Structures of Books I–VII of the Vulgate
Atharvavedasam. hitā . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1

Alexander Lubotsky
PS 8.15. Offense against a Brahmin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

Werner Knobl
Zwei Studien zum Wortschatz der Paippalāda-Sam. hitā . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Yasuhiro Tsuchiyama
On the meaning of the word rās. t.rá: PS 10.4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

Timothy Lubin
The Nı̄larudropanis.ad and the Paippalādasam. hitā: A Critical Edition with Trans-
lation of the Upanis.ad and Nārāyan. a’s Dı̄pikā . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81

Arlo Griffiths
The Ancillary Literature of the Paippalāda School: A Preliminary Survey
with an Edition of the Caran. avyūhopanis.ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141

Alexis Sanderson
Atharvavedins in Tantric Territory: The Āṅgirasakalpa Texts of the Oriya Paip-
palādins and their Connection with the Trika and the Kālı̄kula. With critical
editions of the Parājapavidhi, the Parāmantravidhi, and the *Bhadrakālı̄mantra-
vidhiprakaran. a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 195

Kei Kataoka
Was Bhat.t.a Jayanta a Paippalādin? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 313

Walter Slaje
Three Bhat.t.as, Two Sult.āns, and the Kashmirian Atharvaveda . . . . . . . . . . 329

Annette Schmiedchen
Epigraphical Evidence for the History of Atharvavedic Brahmins . . . . . . . 355

Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 387

arlogriffiths
Note
Griffiths, Arlo, and Annette Schmiedchen, eds. 2007. The Atharvaveda and Its Paippalādaśākhā: Historical and Philological Papers on a Vedic Tradition. Indologica Halensis 11. Aachen: Shaker.

Page 203

Atharvavedins in Tantric Territory

The Āṅgirasakalpa Texts of the Oriya Paippalādins and their
Connection with the Trika and the Kālı̄kula

With critical editions of the Parājapavidhi, the Parāmantravidhi,
and the *Bhadrakālı̄mantravidhiprakaran. a

Alexis Sanderson

Introduction: The Rise of Āgamic Ritual

The early medieval period, from the fifth century onwards, saw the Śaivism of
the Mantramārga rise to pre-eminence as the principal beneficiary of patronage
throughout the Indian subcontinent and in much of Southeast Asia. Among the
religious specialists whom we would expect to have been adversely affected by
this development were those brahmins, Atharvavedins or adherents of other
Vedas versed in the rituals of the Atharvaveda, who had long been appointed
to office as the personal priests of rulers (rājapurohitah. ), performing their conse-
cration ceremonies (rājyābhis. ekah. and pus.yābhis. ekah. ) and a wide range of rituals,
regular and occasional, for the protection of the kingdom and the thwarting of
its enemies.1

It is not possible to establish from the evidence known to me how far this of-
fice was overshadowed or diminished by the rise of Śaivism in particular king-
doms and periods. But encroachment by Śaiva officiants into ritual territory
long reserved to it is clear from the literature that sets out the rituals that they
should or may perform when occasion arises. The Śaivas prescribed their own
form of royal consecration ceremony, to be performed by their officiants for a
king who had received Śaiva initiation; they offered a full range of apotropaic,
protective, and hostile rituals, both Saiddhāntika and Śākta Śaiva, for which
kings were the natural patrons; and they had in the Netratantra detailed instruc-
tions for a class of officiants whose practice shadowed or took over most of the
functions in which the brahmanical rājapurohitah. operated, including the per-
formance on the king’s behalf of his daily and periodic worship.

The Netratantra, I have argued, is a Kashmirian work, and there is no evi-
dence that it was followed widely outside Kashmir itself. It is possible, there-
fore, that it had little or no impact on the practice of courts in other regions.2

Moreover, while the practice of giving Śaiva initiation to kings is well and
widely documented from the seventh century onwards, that of following this

1On the question of the Veda of the king’s personal priest see nn. 28 and 29 on p. 204 below.
2On the function, provenance, date, and influence of the Netratantra see SANDERSON 2005b.

Page 403

INDEX 395

sodarya-, 29
Somadeva, 290
Someśvara Bhat.t.a, 182
Śrāddhakalpa, 186
Śrāddhasūtra, 147
Śrāddhavidhi, 186
Śrı̄dhara, 180, 184, 187
Śrı̄kumāra (author of Tātparyadı̄pikā on

Tattvaprakāśa), 88
Śrı̄ndravarman, 290
Śrı̄sūkta, 217
Śrı̄vara, 330
Sr

˚
s.t.ikālı̄, 286

Sūhabhat.t.a, 332, 348
death in 1417 AD, 335, 344

Śuka, 334
Sukhatı̄rtha, 231
śukla = śukra (month name), 340
Svacchandabhairava, 220
Svacchandatantra, 240, 244
Svāmināyaka, 231
Svapnādhyāya, 185
Śvetāśvataropanis.ad, 237, 252

Pāśupata terminology in, 253
Swami Lakshman, 238
sword, 213, 274, 288–291, 293–295

Taleju, 295
Tañjāvūr, 238
tantra (‘ritual sequence’), 183
Tantrarājatantrāvatārastotra, 295
Tantrasadbhāva, 237
Tantrasārasam. grahamantravimarśinı̄, 200
Tantrasārasam. grahavyākhyāna, 200
Tantravārttika, 182, 334
Tārā, 235
Tattvas (twenty-six), 230
Thai of Sukhothai, 290
t.hakkura, 342
tı̄ks.n. a (assassin), 349
Tilakācārya (Buddhist), 339
tithipati, 341
traditional learning in Kashmir

measures against, 333
restoration of, 339

Trailokyamohana Mantra, 234

tribal alliance, 74, 75
tribute (balı́), 73
Trika, 237
tripāt.hin, 368
Tripurabhairavı̄, 215, 220
tritārı̄, 242
triveda, 358, 373
Tübingen PS manuscript, 142, 330, 340,

344
colophon of, 344, 345
dating of, 345, 348
Yuddhabhat.t.a’s archetype of, 345

Tulajā Bhavānı̄, 289
tulāpurus.a, 369
Tumburu, 119
turus.ka, 338

Ucchis.t.arudras, 198
Ucchus.makalpa, 196
Ucchus.marudra(s), 196, 198
Udayadeśika, 231
Ugratārā, 236
Ujjain, 293
Umānandanātha, 238
upādhyāyakula, 364
Upanayana, 206
Upanis.adic literature, corpora of, 148
Upanis.ad-names

lists of fifteen/eighteen/twenty-
three/twenty-eight, 175,
177

Upanis.ads of the Atharvaveda, 81, 143,
216

upatvacā-, 67
Upavars.a, 202
Utkala, 229
Utsa, 349
Utsabhava, 346
Uttarāmnāya, 283
Uttarāmnāyayajñakrama, 283
uttaratantra, 183
uvaccan

¯
, 278

Vādibhairava, 231
Vaijayantı̄, 47
Vaikhāyanagotra, 173
Vaikun. t.ha, 222

Page 404

396 INDEX

Vais.n. ava(s), 196, 216, 222, 225, 226, 232,
234

Vaitānakalpa, 184, 203, 209
Vaitānasūtra, 184
Vakratun. d. a, 222
Vāmanabhavadāsı̄ya, 209
Varāhapurān. a, 198
Vārāhı̄, 238
Varn. apat.ala, 185
Vāstusūtropanis.ad, 145
vātı̄kārá, 90
ved (‘to know’)

1pl. form vidmas of, 28
Vedāṅgas, (list of) six, 173, 175, 182
Vedāntic, 226
Vedic ritual, drift away from, 196
Veṅkat.a Mādhava, 180
videśagamana, 333
◦vidhi (element used in titles of

Paippalāda ancillary texts), 172
vidyāsthānāni, 315, 333, 334
Vijñānabhairava (Rudra), 213, 239

mantra of, 220
Vikramorvaśı̄ya, 60
Vimalaprabodha, 283
vināyakābhis. eka (*vināyakasenābhis. eka?), 176
vināyakasena, 176
Vindhyavāsinı̄, 290
Vı̄rakeśarideva, 152
Vı̄ranātha, 296
Vis.n. udharmottarapurān. a, 188, 202, 334
Vis.n. upurān. a, 202
Vis.n. usmr

˚
ti, 48

Vis.n. usūkta, 217
visualization, 227
Viśvamātr

˚
, 258

Viśvāmitra, 24
Viśvaprakāśa, 92
Vivāhapustaka, 145
vowel shortening before consonant

cluster, 38
Vratapustaka, 145
vratas, list of eighteen, 177
vyāpakanyāsa, 225, 240
Vyūhas (four), 219

war, 75
victory in, 211

Warangal, 289

Yājñavalkyasmr
˚
ti, 48, 63, 204, 334

yáks.ma-/yaks.ma-, 42, 105
Yantra, 146, 210, 212, 214, 215, 264, 273,

275
Yaśaskara, 296
yavana (Muslim), 338
Yodhabhat.t.a, 335
Yogamārtan. d. a, 249
Yogapı̄t.ha, 243
Yonigahvara, 282
Yonimudrā, 249
Yuddhabhat.t.a, 333

Zayn
accession, 343
birth, 340, 344
death, 343
death and burial, 340
exile, 344
rule as Sult.ān, commencement of, 344
seizure of power, 340

Zayn-Prakāśa, 335
Zhou Daguan, 290

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